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20121205
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a book with steve forbes, "how capitalism will save us: why free people and free markets are the best answer in today's economy" elizabeth ames, first of all, tell us about yourself and your personal experience, particularly when it comes to economics. >> i've been a finance journalist, but i've also been on both sides of the press release. so i started as a journalist and have my own pr business and they've also done projects, communication projects with clients. among them, co-authored the book. basically i were to steve forbes and conversations led to the idea for this book. >> how did you meet steve forbes? >> i met him at an event i did when i was working in southern california and one thing led to another. i moved back to new york. i am from new york and started working at "forbes" of the pr department. >> elizabeth ames, or practical experience, how do that that? >> i've learned a lot since "forbes." when i sat "forbes" islandwide about markets. again, i began as a journalist and worked at "businessweek" many years ago as a journalist. but when i started to work as an entrepren
't believe including current these. i agree with steve forbes that flow currencies, which is the standard value by which every entrepreneur has to guide and has decisions it's like floating our so that people wouldn't have to work so much. one man could have the power worth 50 minutes. the next come the 70 minute and needs in-house default swaps and insurance policies. just to guide the economy. one of the things that's happened over the last decade is that we've had a hypertrophy of finance and the reason of the excess and waste so much wealth and the economy is migrated to finance is because the currency is so unstable, that so much money can be made, betting on the ups and downs of our currency against foreign currencies. this is a big danger today. a lot of people attack the chinese for manipulating the currency. but the chinese just want to keep the currency stable. i saw the chinese want to do. they want to maintain the dollar as a standard of value. it's a saturday botching the currency. the threat to the american dollar does not come in beijing. they defend the dollar. the threat
point. >> [inaudible] >> steve, you just recently, not even a year ago, gave a congressional hearing; correct? you spoke to congress? >> briefly. [laughter] >> this is, you know, this is about as clear as the impression you get at of the pakistani administration right now, that is very well-supported by the american government. what could you, you know, what could you take away from this, and what do you think the forces -to-be can do to discourage bringing a certain level of democracy to pakistan? >> well, i'd rather your thoughts on that question -- >> oh, no, we get to hear you now. [laughter] >> well, i thought one thing that's important to emphasize, the last answer was really an important sort of sense of direction because, you know, the problem is that even american policy, when it tries to prevent military identity inside pakistan by encouraging the restoration of the democratic parties, can't reach the fact that the ppp has not had an internal election since time and memoriam, can't reach the fact that the pml a basically gang operations for families, and so then what is exa
in chicago. she wrote stallions for steve mcqueen. so i'm writing this book. i was than his personal involvement. it is a great door in a great woman. gradually i find clues that may be somebody else was killed in her place. somebody saying i was the woman. i went to her she has to go to high school. there was no date, but a remark. maybe find out how she was alive. i've been asking ever about it. send sitting there saying she has to be alive. i've been written a book by woman by us go there and she's alive. the phone rings and a voice says hi. i understand you've been looking for me. that's a cool thing. as a woman, very modest, did some amazing stuff. i'd say i have the one that i enjoy the most was about print story which became the movie autofocus. i try to keep my word people. people know that when it comes to everything. but with a suitcase. they literally had to buy tickets so heavy of his fellow nobody near. forgot the trial after 17 years, new evidence. this really worked out extremely well. again a fabulous movie. entries will be of course i.d. act is an absolute masterpiec
way to the witness panel beginning with steve haydee who was hurt and served for three consecutive mandates as the armed groups experts on the drc. investigate and co-authored reports submitted and presented to the u.n. security council sanctions committee during the groups expire 2012 mandate he was also coordinator of the six member team working under security council resolution 2021. prior to joining the group of experts, mr. hege worked with organizations. really here with john prendergast, cofounder of the enough project, initiative to end genocide and crimes against humanity. these are the quick administration and the state department congress. he's worked with unicef, human rights, international crisis group and episode five and help launch the sentinel project pictures clingy. mr. prendergast to search for peace in africa for well over a quarter century. then we would hear from mvemba dizolele, who is a visiting fellow at hanford university server is petitioned the professor, lecturing africans to visit john's heart and university school of events international studies. mr.
booktv highlights a few programs about economics. james gustav, steve forbes and george gilder all weigh in. watch this and more all weekend long on booktv. for a complete schedule, visit booktv.org. >> now, from albany, new york, we hear about the state-mandated new york state writer's institute. the program promotes cultural initiatives through author presentations, workshops, film screen things and more -- screenings and more. >> i can see each event just as vividly as i can see the posters before me. i'm donald faulkner, i'm director of the new york state writer's institute, and what we do, what i do is kind of herd intellectual cats. we bring a lot of writers through to albany to do readings, we also do a number of other types of programs, events, writing workshops and film series and programs with young writers and a summer institute that we run in saratoga. >> the life of the -- my life in the last few years was, i suppose you'd call it adventurous. but this thing ruined everything. [laughter] >> we go far and wide, find the best writers that we can and bring them to albany.
house at steve santa plaza in beautiful downtown troy. right now we're at the stuyvesant plaza store, and we have been here since 1975, and we sell books. real books. books that you can hold in your hand, crack open, cuddle up in a chair with, those kind of books. i started out in the publishing industry, i was a sales rep for simon and schuster and then for penguin -- then putnam, that was back in the '90s and '8 o -- '70s and '80s. and i sold books all over upstate new york and throughout demand. and after about ten years i decided i wanted to go to the other side of the counter and sell books. and so i went to work for the bookstore here in this plaza, and i eventually bought into the business and then bought the business out. and so i have been here since, as sole owner, since 1991. and it's been an up and down history since then. shortly after i purchased the store with a small business administration loan, it was barnes & noble and borders moved in, and the -- literally, the literary landscape of albany, new york, changed overnight as it did across the country. because that exp
, but as steve hawkins said earlier, to challenge the system of power that is now controlling things and has to be changed if were going to be a chart two, livable for future generations. thank you area match. [applause] >> bar from albany, new york with a time help of time warner cable we talk with her libraries. >> the new york state library goes back to 1818, one of the first eight libraries in the nation at the very, very proud among tradition of being able to share resources with everyone. certainly the grilled libraries for me one of the cornerstones, sort of the diamond at the top in terms of saying the commitment new york makes his people is a commitment to everyone. if you take a moment to think about not being able to open that book and read at without some other kind of intervention, you get the idea this is a pretty amazing service that the government has created and we been able to offer in new york for decades and decades. >> this is the free service that is offered through the national library service for the blind in the library of commerce to citizens in all 50 states. the f
's ceremony in 1981. the person in charge of building the platform is steve ayers, the architect of the capital. the platform will be about 10,000 square feet. the same size as the platform in 2005, which was the largest platform ever built. as you know, on this there will be 1600 people were comes to this platform. it has to be very strong. the former president, joins you, governors, and the diplomatic corps. one of which comes from brooklyn, one comes from near chattanooga. it is a bipartisan concept inaugural. the platform is made whole with specification so everyone can see pretty well. the design began more than a year ago. construction began in september. >> thank you, jack. george washington was supposed to have said that the most important inauguration was not the first one but the second want to see if we could reaffirm or transfer powers. whether we are republicans or democrats come we are looking forward to this. >> can we have mr. kerry did say something? >> thank you, senator. i am grateful to be here on behalf of the presidential inaugural committee. the partnership
that carlyle should be looked at. >> steve reed. >> chancellor aware because of his continuing inadequate level of funding to school building which today's statement is not correct, london councils across party body is estimating that by 2016, one in every 10 primary age children and son will not have a permanent school place? >> first of all, can i take this opportunity to welcome him to the house of commons. congratulate him on his victory. he rightly wants to speak on behalf of his constituents. what i would say is the pressure on london's schoolhouschoolhou ses, for some years is a huge issue when we came into office. we have provided additional capital spending for new school places. the money we announced over a billion pounds we announced today is also to deal with areas where there's high pressure. i will make sure that my runoff on education secretary -- [inaudible] >> julian smith. >> more money for the regional growth fund is great news for yorkshire. and the chancellor give details to the house of? >> there will be more money for the region growth fund. that has been help for securi
you make a deal. >> at this moment does it look like the image of a christmas eve company or steve or do week over the cliff? >> who knows. somebody who thinks they know is only guessing. maybe there's some strategy in the white house that by a certain date a work something out. >> really stop the morning with the papers. we still love the current papers. mr. woodward is assistant managing editor of the "washington post," which says fiscal year earnings yet to face wall street as stock markets are convinced that the fiscal drama is going to work out. the "financial times" has the opposite headline. they say wall street anxiety grows. so which of these is more true? >> on wall street they live in the zone of eternal and i'm peaceful coexistence of optimism and pessimism. you can talk to somebody who's in the investment world on wall street and in the morning and they're optimistic in in the afternoon their pessimistic. so i think probably one, you know, don't know. both papers have great reporters and they're talking to people about that and so forth. if you look, i would go with de
was a senator. >> steve case chairman of the case foundation co-founder of the mayor, line and so we're very fortunate to have seized pianos. they each have between five and seven minutes. and we will have a conversation. >> but we're looking at the immigration policy is and how they interact high skilled immigrants. of course, it is an issue of higher education because colleges if the policies make it difficult for the international students, and then we need to cut back of the issue came to the forefront of recent reports by 2009 water the top two actions of federal government, state, local, re search universities assure the ability of doctoral education needed to help me to national goals for energy and environment and security in the 21st century. the working group of the national academy inform public opinion, shape policy. that question posed by congress is pretty complicated and those leaders needed to put together a panel. from business, an industry, academy, government i have the privilege of being a member of the panel. asking for action three universities with 10 recommendations w
Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12